State-by-State Breakdown of Concentrate Laws

The rules and regulations surrounding cannabis concentrates differ drastically depending on what state you call home. Nevada and Oregon, for instance, are exceptionally tolerant of concentrates and have no penalty or fine for personal amounts, while a crumb’s worth of hash or wax could lead to time in prison in other states. Every state has different approaches to regulating cannabis concentrates. Whether you live in a liberated state where concentrates are not highly punishable, or if your state has a long way to go in terms of concentrate reform, here’s a list of every state’s stance on concentrate laws.

Alabama

Gov. Robert Bentley signed SB-174, or Carly’s Law, on April 1, 2014, which allows CBD oil for those suffering from epilepsy. Possession of hash or concentrates, however, is punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Even possession of tiny amounts of hash is a Class C felony, and small amounts carry no lesser penalty. Penalties rise if minors or the intent to manufacture are involved.

Alaska

Ballot Measure 2 was approved by voters in November 2014 to regulate recreational cannabis, however, possession of small amounts of concentrates is a misdemeanor and possession of over three grams is a felony and punishable up to two years. Delivery of hash or concentrates is also a felony and punishable up to three years.

Arizona

Possession of concentrates is a Class 4 felony and punishable with up to three years and nine months imprisonment. The manufacturing of hash or concentrates is considered a Class 3 felony and punishable to up to 12 years and nine months. Arizona also considers possession of paraphernalia a felony.

Arkansas

Penalties for concentrates in Arkansas are exactly the same as cannabis, meaning possessing small amounts of hash, up to four ounces, is considered a misdemeanor punishable by a $2,500 fine and a maximum of one year in jail.

California

Californians ages 21 and over can legally possess up to eight grams of hash or concentrates without any penalty. Possession of more than eight grams is a misdemeanor and punishable to a maximum fine of $500. The unlicensed chemical manufacturing of concentrates, however, can result in three to seven years imprisonment.

Colorado

You’re free and in the clear to possess concentrates in Colorado, as long as you have less than an ounce. Possession of personal amounts carries no penalty. Up to three ounces is a misdemeanor punishable up to six to 18 months imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.

Connecticut

Less than one-half ounce of cannabis or hash is considered merely a civil penalty. More than that is considered a misdemeanor and punishable with a $2,000 fine.

Delaware

Possession of an ounce or less of cannabis or concentrates is not considered a crime and results in a civil penalty. Gov. Jack Markell signed SB-90, or Rylie’s Law on June 23, 2015, which sets up a registry for cannabis oil for qualifying patients with epilepsy.

Florida

Possession of 20 grams or less of flower is a misdemeanor, but possession of any amount of hash or concentrate is a felony and punishable with up to five years of incarceration. Gov. Rick Scott signed SB-1030, which allows cannabis oil with under 0.8 percent THC and more than 10 percent CBD for patients with cancer, chronic seizures or severe muscle spasms.

Georgia

Possession of any amount of concentrate with 15 percent or more THC is a felony. On April 16, 2015, Gov. Nathan Deal signed HB-1, or Haleigh’s Hope Act, which allows cannabis oil with no more than five percent THC for patients with a variety of illnesses.

Hawaii

Hawaii considers less than one-eighth of an ounce of hash to be a misdemeanor and punishable with a $2,000 fine and up to one year in prison. More than one-eighth is considered a felony.

Idaho

Hash and concentrates are not defined and therefore, the punishment is the same as cannabis. Three ounces or less is considered a misdemeanor and punishable with up to one year and a maximum $1,000 fine.

Illinois

Possession of 10 grams or less of cannabis or concentrates is a civil violation with a maximum $200 fine. Penalties slowly rise for larger amounts.

Indiana

Less than two grams of concentrate is a Class A misdemeanor and over five grams is a level 6 felony punishable with six months to two-and-a-half years in prison.

Iowa

Gov. Terry Branstad signed SF-2360 into law on May 30, 2014, which allows for the possession of CBD concentrates with less than three percent THC. The bill received heavy support from families who advocated for medical cannabis laws.

Kentucky

Penalties for cannabis and hash are equally lenient. Less than eight ounces of either is considered a misdemeanor. On April 10, 2014, Gov. Steve Beshear signed SB-124 into law, and it excludes cannabidiol from the state’s definition of cannabis.

Louisiana

Possession of 14 grams or less of concentrate is not classified as a crime and carries a maximum fine of $300 and 15 days in jail. Possessing over 14 grams of cannabis can lead to a fine up to $500 and six months in jail.

Maine

Possession of five grams or less carries no penalty. Over five grams can lead to up to a year in prison and a $2,000 fine. Trafficking concentrates is punishable from five to 10 years in prison.

Maryland

Possession of 10 grams is considered a civil offense with no risk of jail time or and a maximum $100 fine. Punishments are the same for possession of cannabis.

Massachusetts

Possession of up to five grams of concentrates carries no penalty and no fine. Possession of more than that, and up to an ounce is only a civil offense with a maximum $100 fine.

Michigan

Qualifying patients may possess 16 ounces of solid concentrate or up to 36 fluid ounces for each ounce of dried leaves or flowers. Non-patients are subject to a maximum $2,000 fine and up to a year incarceration.

Minnesota

Possession of 45.2 grams or less is considered a misdemeanor with a maximum of fine of $200. More than that is considered a felony and punishments increase with higher amounts.

Mississippi

Possessing 0.1 grams of hash is a misdemeanor or felony with a maximum fine of $1,000; 0.1-2 grams is a felony and punishable up to three years. For higher amounts, there is a risk of the accused spending eight years or more in prison. Gov. Phil Bryant signed HB-1231 on April 17, 2014, which allows for concentrates containing over 15 percent CBD and less than 0.5 percent THC. CBD oil must be obtained from the University of Mississippi and dispensed by the Department of Pharmacy Services at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

Missouri

Possession of 10 grams or less is considered a misdemeanor and can carry a maximum fine of $500. On July 14, 2014, Gov. Jay Nixon signed HB-2238 into law. HB-2238 allows consumption of cannabis oil that is at least five percent CBD and less than 0.3 percent THC for intractable epilepsy.

Montana

Possession of one gram or less of concentrate can lead to a misdemeanor punishable with up to six months in prison and a maximum fine of $500. Over one gram of concentrate is considered a felony punishable up to three years.

Nebraska

Although possession of personal amounts of cannabis is only an infraction, possession of concentrates is a Class IV felony punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

Nevada

Possession of up to one-eighth ounce (3.5 grams) of hash or concentrates is not a crime and there is no penalty.

New Hampshire

Possession of five grams or less of hash or concentrates is considered a misdemeanor and punishable by up to a year in prison and a $2,000 fine.

New Jersey

Five grams or less of hash is not a crime but the offender will be issued a Disorderly Person with up to six months in jail and a maximum $1,000 fine. Larger amounts incur harsher punishments.

New Mexico

No limits apply, but any amount of hash is punishable to $500-$1,000 and a maximum one-year sentence.

New York

Possession of less than one-quarter ounce of concentrate is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a maximum $1,000 fine. Over one-quarter ounce is punishable by up to seven years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

North Carolina

Possession of 1.4 grams or less is a Class 3 misdemeanor and gets you a $200 fine. Up to 4.25 grams is a Class 1 misdemeanor with a 1-45 day sentence. Gov. Pat McCrory signed HB-1220, which allows universities to conduct clinical trials of CBD oil. The CBD oil must contain less than 0.3 percent THC and at least 10 percent CBD. CBD oil can only be used for the treatment of intractable epilepsy.

North Dakota

Ingesting concentrates is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a $3,000 fine. Possession, however, is a felony and punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Manufacturing concentrates can lead to a felony with 10 years in prison and a maximum $20,000 fine.

Ohio

Possession of five grams solid or one gram liquid concentrate is a misdemeanor with no incarceration and a $150 fine. Penalties rise based on the amount and possession becomes a felony with a maximum one year in prison and a $2,500 fine at 10 grams for a solid and two grams for a liquid concentrate.

Oklahoma

Possession of any amount of cannabis or concentrates is a misdemeanor, however processing cannabis into hash is a felony and punishable with up to two years in jail. Gov. Mary Fallin signed HB-2154, which allows consumption of cannabis oil containing less than 0.3 percent THC for the treatment of severe epilepsy.

Oregon

There are no penalties for the possession of 16 ounces or less of solid concentrates at home, 72 ounces or less of infused liquids at home or one ounce or less of extract at home. However, unlicensed concentrates bought through the black market can lead to a misdemeanor or felony depending on the amount.

Pennsylvania

Medical patients may possess a 30-day supply of concentrates. Eight grams or less of hash or concentrate is a misdemeanor with a $500 fine and maximum 30 days in prison.

Rhode Island

An ounce or less of concentrate or flowers is only a civil violation with no incarceration and a maximum $150 fine.

South Carolina

On June 2, 2014, Gov. Nikki Haley signed S-1035, or Julian’s Law, which allows patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Dravet Syndrome and other severe forms of epilepsy to obtain CBD oil.

South Dakota

Possession of any amount of concentrate is a felony punishable up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine. The punishment is identical for manufacturing concentrates. Paraphernalia can also lead to a misdemeanor with a maximum $2,000 fine and one year imprisonment.

Tennessee

Possession is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year imprisonment and a $2,500 fine. Manufacturing concentrates is not tolerated and the punishment can lead a sentence of up to 60 years in prison.

Texas

Possession of even less than one gram of concentrate is a felony with a $10,000 fine and up to two years in prison. It can rise up to life in prison for large amounts. Texas even punishes you with up to 180 days in jail for falsifying a drug test.

Utah

Possession of less than an ounce of concentrate or flower results in six months in jail plus a $1,000 fine, and any cannabis conviction results in suspension of a driver’s license for six months.

Vermont

Possession of five grams or less of cannabis concentrates is only a civil violation with a $200 fine and no jail time.

Virginia

Cannabis extract with over 15 percent CBD but under five percent THC is eligible for affirmative defense of prosecution. Possessing any amount of cannabis oil with THC is a felony and punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

Washington

Possession of seven grams or less of concentrate carries no penalty or fine. Over 40 grams, however, results in a felony with up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

West Virginia

Any amount of concentrate or cannabis is a misdemeanor with 90 days to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. The sale of any kind of cannabis is considered a felony with a one-year mandatory sentence that can rise to five years.

Wisconsin

Possession of any amount of concentrate is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in prison and $1,000 fine. It becomes a felony for subsequent offenses which are punishable by up to three-and-a-half years and a maximum fine of $10,000.

Wyoming

Possession of 0.3 grams or less of liquid concentrate is a misdemeanor and is punishable by up to 12 months in prison and a $1,000 fine. Over 0.3 grams is a felony punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

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