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Eight-Year-Old Wins Cannabis Products in Raffle

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An eight-year-old boy in Dawson Creek, British Columbia, Canada made the news when he won a cannabis gift basket at a local hockey game.

According to Hockey Feed, Keith Redl said his grandson plays Novice hockey and was surprised when the prize for a tournament was a $200 gift basket of cannabis products. “Each team is usually responsible for putting a gift basket or prize package together with a minimum value of $50,” he said in a phone interview. “And then, what they do is they have a big setup and they have a paper bag taped in front of each one of these prizes.”

Normally, the prizes are things like movie tickets or other age-appropriate items, but this time was different. “And then at the end of the tournament … [the family] was notified that he won the one prize and it was this prize of $200 worth of pot.”

However, after the mixup, Dawson Creek Minor Hockey released a statement saying that while the prize was up for grabs, it was never intended for children, only for someone who presented a valid ID, and it was all a misunderstanding. They also pointed out that the goodie basket was never something children could just grab if they won.

“Amongst a number of prizes donated was a basket of cannabis products,” they wrote. “The products did not appear on the donation table, only a photo and list of the items contained in the basket.”

“The raffle winner was told the basket contained cannabis products and was given the option of not accepting the prize,” the statement further explained. “The winner chose to take the prize, their identification was checked to ensure they were of legal age (19+), and the donor then delivered the basket to the winners.”

Despite the fact that this incident may have rubbed some the wrong way, most parents who use cannabis claim cannabis enhances their time with their children, and states have gone out of their way to outlaw edibles that might appeal to children. As legal cannabis becomes more common, these stigmas are bound to change.