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Arizona Recreational Cannabis Initiative to Officially Appear on Ballot

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By decree of the Arizona Supreme Court, the initiative known as Smart and Safe Arizona (also called Proposition 207) has officially made it onto the November ballot.

Supreme Court Judge James Smith rejected arguments against the initiative earlier in August, and on August 20 his decision was upheld. Those who opposed the initiative believed that the initiative did not properly summarize the changes that would occur if it became law. One example of this was featured through a proposed 16 percent excise tax on cannabis sales that cannot be changed later on. However, Judge Smith wrote in his ruling that the principal provisions were adequately described by the initiative. “Addressing legalizing a previously illegal substance must account for laws touching many parts of life,” Smith wrote. “But if everything in an initiative is a principal provision, then nothing is.”

Smart and Safe Arizona would allow people 21 and older to possess, consume and sell cannabis for recreational purposes. The aforementioned 16 percent excise tax would help fund state services such as community colleges, public safety, health and roads (an estimated total of $300 million every year. The initiative calls for the creation of a licensing organization to protect already existing medical cannabis businesses. It would also allow for 26 social equity licenses dedicated strictly to members of the community who have been negatively impacted by the war on drugs.

Advocates in Arizona have long sought to legalize recreational cannabis, as seen in the ballot initiative that didn’t pass in the 2016 election season. It was one of the only states whose cannabis-related measure did not pass, in comparison to states like California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada, which all passed recreational cannabis measures successfully. If voters choose to vote for Smart and Safe Arizona, Arizona could become the 11th state to legalize recreational cannabis.

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Strain of the Week: Midnite

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Whoever first said that “nothing good happens after midnight” clearly was not enjoying life. Maybe it was said to perpetuate safety, specifically toward rambunctious youth who went gallivanting around in the forest at night. Or maybe it was more geared toward superstitious beliefs about witches or paranormal entities who roam around when the sun goes down. Either way, whoever said it definitely hadn’t seen a Gremlins movie, which contrary to the plot which warns against feeding a Gremlin at night, is one of the weirdest and best 1980s movies ever (change our mind). Ultimately though, cannabis after midnight can be a treat, especially when it’s a strain like Midnite.

Midnite is a cross between Bubba Kush and Chem #4. Bubba Kush is well-known for its earthiness, deep pine aroma and ability to induce sleep (not to mention that, as reviewers put it, it’s so widely loved that consuming it is often like “greeting an old friend at the airport”). Chem #4, which is also short for Chemdog/Chemdawg, is a zesty hybrid, complete with scents and flavors of lemon, that delivers full body effects of relaxation and euphoria. Between these two powerhouse strains create a unique strain child that’s full of potential.

Described as light green and denser than a dogwood tree, Midnite strain samples were absolutely covered in frosty trichomes—so much that it almost seemed like it was covered in freshly fallen snow, or even might glow when placed in a dark place. Surprisingly, the bud didn’t have much of a scent until it was ground up, revealing a potent chemmy aroma that made our seasoned reviewers salivate. Upon inhalation, the flower was robust but not harsh, leading to full body relaxation that didn’t feel lethargic. It won’t stop anyone from getting a full night’s sleep when ready to crash, however, and the rest of its qualities were deep and relaxing.

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Virginia to Focus on Legal Cannabis in 2021 Legislative Session

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Some legislators in Virginia are planning on pushing for support to consider recreational cannabis this year.

The 2021 legislative session in Virginia, which began on January 13, will be conducted remotely as the pandemic continues to be a major concern. The state’s House of Delegates will be meeting entirely remotely, and the Vermont Senate will meet at a conference center instead of at the state capitol building.

To start off this year’s legislative session, there are multiple topics on the table for discussion, including COVID-19 relief and the death penalty repeal. But perhaps the most contentious issue of all is the discussion of recreational cannabis legalization.

During this legislative push, Governor Ralph Northam is once again making it known that he would like to see recreational cannabis legalized. If Virginia legislators make a move, they will be the first Southern state to fully legalize cannabis. Currently, the state only allows medical cannabis, which went into effect on July 1, 2020.

Northam, who has been speaking out in favor of recreational legalization since November 2020, would like to see a legal approach that makes sure youth safety is high priority and also prioritizes the struggle of marginalized people disproportionately affected by the War on Drugs.

The success of this push for legalization will hinge on whether or not there are enough votes in the legislature in favor of legal cannabis for it to pass. However, even Republicans are coming around to cannabis issues in many states, and Virginia has successfully decriminalized cannabis and legalized a medical program.

Despite the fact that the state has already laid the groundwork for full, recreational legalization, it remains to be seen whether Virginia will follow through and successfully legalize cannabis this year.

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WSU Study Finds Cannabis May Diminish Stress Response

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A new study from Washington State University (WSU) has found that cannabis may diminish a user’s physiological response to stress.

Researchers found female rats that self-administered daily puffs of cannabis vapor for a month had lower blood levels of a hormone that causes stress when presented with a stressful situation than they did at the beginning of the experiment and compared to a control group. The rats were trained to trigger an infrared sensor that would activate a puff of cannabis vapor anytime they felt the urge. Previous studies have shown cannabis could have an effect on stress response.

After 30 days, only female rats that had access to the cannabis had a significantly muted response to stress. The rats that were given access to cannabis also tended to respond more for the substance and had higher concentrations in their blood after the experiment. Male rats did not experience the same results, but they also self-administered a lot less.  

“We don’t know if this is a good thing or a bad thing and there’s reason to argue for either of them at this point—a blunted stress response might actually predispose some people to certain mental health conditions is our concern,” said co-author of the study and WSU assistant professor of psychology, Carrie Cuttler. “So yeah, it sounds great on the surface that maybe they’re less prone to stress…but the stress response is an important system that exists for a reason—any alterations in that or perturbations in that system may or may not be a good thing.”

WSU assistant professor and another co-author of the study, Ryan McClain, mentioned there are ethical and legal concerns with testing stress responses on humans, as well as administering cannabis to some of the human participants, so these kinds of studies are limited to animal models.

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